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The Three “Martins” : Martin Petit (#194)

This is the last of the posts in the “Martins” series.

Martin Petit’s career path is not unlike those of the “Martins” in the two previous posts; Maxim Martin and Martin Matte.

Petit’s first big breaks into the public arena were through improve in the 1980s, and as a member of a comedy troupe and at the Juste pour rire (Just for Laughs) festival in the 1990s.  His participation at some of the best known comedy festivals was much more high profile than most comedians – eventually allowing him to take the reins as master of ceremonies.

In the early 2000s, he made the leap to high-profile radio.  The mid-2000s saw him host his own morning radio shows.  Later he was given the opportunity to host one of the most popular radio shows in Montréal, “Le monde est Petit” (“The World is Small”, a play on his surname) on NRJ.

Petit’s radio-presence made him a household name, and added to the furor and high-ticket sales for his one-man comedy shows.  He became a “must-have” figure for various events, and he became a host for Radio-Canada’s annual gala, with 1.5 million viewers.

He embarked in acting with his role in the very successful film Les Boys 2.  His acting career continued as a cast member of the very popular TV show, Un gars, une fille.

He was a co-writer of Montréwood’s most successful movie in 2011 (in terms of box office sales), Starbuck.

He currently has his own sitcom television show, Les pêcheurs; one of the better-known weekly TV shows in Québec.

Martin Petit’s official website is http://www.martinpetit.com/ (with ticket information for his upcoming shows).

The website for the TV show, Les pêcheurs is http://lespecheurs.radio-canada.ca/emission-infos/

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The Three “Martins” : Martin Matte (#193)

The last post looked at Maxim MartinThis post will look at Martin Matte.

Martin Matte’s own career is not unlike that of the other two celebrities in this “Three Martins” blog-post series.

However, of all the three Martins, Martin Mattes’ career has perhaps seen the biggest success.   He has been one of the most high-profile, highly sought after celebrities of the last couple of years in Montréwood.   For the sake of comparisons, in terms of his celebrity status (if I were to compare him to other celebrities in the same age bracket), his star power perhaps is to Montréwood what Matt Damon’s would be to Hollywood (although their career paths and focus are very different).

Martin Matte’s background was stand-up comedy, from which he launched his career in the 1990s — and which he still occasionally does (he was one of Québec’s most successful comedians of the 2000’s).   But since then, he has gone on to become a very successfully sitcom actor and charity activist.

His longest sitcom career was on Caméra Café for 4 years (until 2006).

He now is the main actor in the very successful sitcom, Les Beaux Malaises on TVA.

Considering how famous he is, I find it surprising he has not done much acting in movies.  He has done one movie, however – Nitro, in 2007

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Click HERE for a funny scene between Martin Matte & Guylaine Tremblay (the subject of an earlier post) on TVA’s website.

A short, comical scene from the sitcom Les Beaux Malaises on TVA’s YouTube channel can be viewed here:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lfXLtUJpoPg

One of the main reason he has become quite popular is because of his regular television appearances.  It is difficult to not see him, almost on a daily basis, somewhere on Montréwood television.  He is regularly on the most popular talk shows (for example, I think he has probably been on Tout le monde en parle more than most semi-regular guests).  He’s often seen in television advertisements and he’s usually front and centre in television gala events, as well as a regular on morning and daily variety shows.

Regardless of where you are in anglophone Canada, If you’re just starting to watch Francophone television, Martin Matte is a must-know in order to help sort out the “who’s who” in your mind.

The official website of his charity foundation is here: http://www.fondationmartinmatte.com/.

The Three “Martins” : Maxim Martin (#192)

Here’s the first celebrity in the 3-part “Martin” series:  Maxim Martin.

I’ll keep this one short since I’m doing the Montréal-Toronto trip today on the highway (I’m actually quickly writing this post from an OnRoute roadstop on the 401).

Originally Franco-Manitobain from Manitoba, Maxim Martin made his entry into Québec’s pop-culture with a big leap from doing comedy gigs in Winnipeg to doing comedy at the Juste pour Rire festival in the 1990s.  Québec has since been his home.

Considering how well known Maxim Martin is, he’s not controversial or extreme in any sense.   But there are some notable things about him.

His love-life has occasionally been the subject of tabloids and talk shows, and he doesn’t shy away from it in his own media appearances or comedy acts.  For many years, he has been a single father.

He regularly talks about his adolescent daughter, Livia, in his comedy acts and on other media platforms – and he she has appeared in television herself.  Apparently she has a twitter feed which has garnered a lot of attention.

Although he’s a comedian at heart, Martin has been a radio host on one of Montréal’s most popular radio stations, he has been the co-host of a morning television bric-a-brac show, he has hosted regular sports slots on TVA Sports (he’s a big sports fan, and he has reported quite a bit on junior hockey leagues), and he’s also an actor.

Two recent films in which Martin has starred are the thriller films Manigances (2012 & 2013).

Mgn

One thing worth mentioning is that he is one of the “greener” pop-culture stars on environmental issues.   His website even features elements on his thoughts on the idea, and the David Suzuki Foundation once did an online feature of Martin.  Maxim Martin at one point hosted an environmental program on the Canal Vox television station.

After a 2-year stage comedy absence, he came roaring back this week with sold-out shows at Théatre St-Denis in Montréal.  Just to give you an idea how popular he is, I tried for two days to get tickets in Montréal, without success, owing to how much demande there was for tickets (I guess it really was the show to see!).   Oh well… next trip.  Back to Toronto now.

His official website (with his blog, performance info & other) is www.maximmartin.com

The Three “Martins” : Introduction (#191)

Here’s a little Quiz for you (answers will be at the bottom) …

  1. Did you know that “Martin” is the most common surname (family name) in France?
  2. But in Québec, “Martin” is not the most common surname. What is it?
  3. Montréwood’s, Québec’s and Canada’s Francophone pop-culture scene has three well-known “Martins”.  Most Francophones know them.  Who might they be?

Hints:

  • The first one is Franco-Manitoban (from Winnipeg). His surname is “Martin”.
  • The second one is from Québec. His given name is “Martin”
  • The above two guys look very similar (their physiques are so similar that some people actually mix them up).
  • The third one is also from Québec. His given name is also “Martin”, but he looks nothing like the first two.
  • All three are stand-up comedians, but they also have their own television programs — either as actors or as hosts.
  • All three are in high demand for television and event appearances; so much so that we have seen them as regulars on the talk show circuit, in gala events, and as invited interview guests for years. Bluntly put, all three are staples of the Montréwood and Francophone pop-culture scene.
  • Additional hints:
    • The first one has an adolescent daughter, Livia, who is regularly referred to in the media when they talk about her dad.
    • The second one likes to talk (I mean really likes to talk)
    • And you would think that the third one likes to fish.
    • All are around the same age

Stumped?

Here are the answers:

  1. Most common Québec surname: “Tremblay”
  2. The three famous “Martins” :
    1. Maxim Martin
    2. Martin Matte
    3. Martin Petit

See if you agree with everyone else that Maxim Martin and Martin Matte look alike.  Here are google images of them:

We’ll learn more about these Martins in the next three posts.

In the meantime, I’m off to see if I can still get tickets for Maxim Martin’s big comedy show here in Montréal tonight (I drive back to Toronto tomorrow… so tonight’s my last chance to take in his show).   Talk to you again soon!!

Elvis Gratton – “Unveiled” (#188)

The last few posts touched on matters which have much to do not only with societal accommodations, and political correctness, but also matters involving society’s respect for others.  Thus, for those of you who DO know “what” Elvis Gratton is, you may think I’m lacking a bit of tact and judgement by writing a post on Elvis Graton directly after a series discussing multiculturalism.

You may even be thinking “There he goes…– he’s going to hold Elvis Gratton above everyone’s heads as a statement of societal intolerance, bigotry and narrow-mindedness”.

Well, actually… don’t get ahead of yourself.   I want to say that I AM going to hold Elvis Gratton up as a statement regarding bigotry, narrow-mindedness, and gross prejudice.  BUT, I’m sure my take on it is going to surprise you.   I’m actually going to tout Elvis Gratton’s place in Québec’s culture to illustrate some of the best of what Québec is – the best of its people, the best of its society, and Québec’s deep concern for others, regardless of their backgrounds.

I need to first explain who and what “Elvis Gratton” is (considering that many Anglophone Canadians may not know about Elvis Gratton).

To start, if I were to mention Cheech and Chong”, most people in Anglophone Canada will definitely remember this iconic Canadian-American comedy duo (at least those who have a cultural recollection of 1980s)

Québec also has two similar cultural phenomenon – which are some of the most iconic, most widely referenced and biggest Québec pop-cultural hits of the last 35 years:

  • The Québec equivalent which could embody the “stage comedy” aspect of Cheech and Chong could be the stage comedic duo Ding et Dong” (popular in the 1980s & 1990s).
  • But the Québec equivalent which could embody the “movie” aspect of Cheech and Chong probably would be “Elvis Gratton” — which not only spanned the 1980s with the release of several movies, but also continued will into the 1990s, and up to 2009 in a later televised series format.

Elvis Gratton was a series of comedy movies, centred on one main character named Bob Gratton.  He had an ever-present sidekick best-friend, Méo.  In the movies, Bob Gratton won an Elvis impersonation competition, it went to his head, and he lived a frankly bizarre life and an even more bizarre view of the world.

Posters for two of the six movies, not to mention 40+ television episodes

e.gr.1

What made the movies stand out was the bigoted nature of its characters, the political incorrectness of the plots, nasty cheap shots at every possible aspect of society, and some of the most crass language and behaviours I have ever seen of any movies in Québec or Canada (if you want to learn every Québec swear word under the sun, you only need to watch 10 minutes of any of the given movies).   The movie was so raw and crass, in fact, that I’m even a little embarrassed to attempt to describe it.  I could go so far to say that it plays on themes which are downright racist (think of the themes of South Park x 10, or Borat x 20).  Needless to say, you’ll be able to find sufficient movie footage of it online to see what I mean.

Why and how could such a series of movies and television shows be such a hit (to the point that I would describe it as an iconic cultural hit)?   I think you have to understand the timing of it in Québec’s own modern history, in addition to understanding the movies’ creator’s own place in society.

In a nutshell, the first movie came out shortly after the first 1980 referendum.  The subsequent movies came out between the two referendums and during the first several years following the 1995 referendum.

The movie director, Pierre Falardeau (died 2009), was one of Québec’s few larger-than-life directors (it’s difficult to not think of Québec cinema without thinking of Pierre Falardeau)Falardeau was a very public supporter of sovereignty, and brought a good deal of philosophical perspective to the arena – debating it from his unique vantage point of the creator of many of Québec’s most appreciated cinematic works.  The loss of the 1980 referendum would have been a tough blow for Falardeau, as would have been the loss of the 1995 referendum.  It’s pure conjecture on my part, but men and women like Farlardeau often express their frustrations through their artistic works.  Their works can also embody a healing process for their own anxieties.

The fact that Falardeau chose to use the Elivs Gratton movies to make fun of the most taboo, most delicate, most emotional and most intense topics in Québec before and after the referendums could possibly have been his way of not only coping with the issues, but perhaps helping society to cope with the issues themselves.

When individuals internalize their own pain and thoughts, the psychological damage can be crippling.  Thus phycologists encourage people to find a way to externalize pain and painful.   I wonder if Falardeau felt that Québec society as a whole was also in need of a psychological therapy session and a way to externalize its referendum anguish.  Perhaps he was using the Elvis Gratton movies as a “psychologist’s sofa” to allow Québec, as a collective society, to revisit and externalize what it had been going through during the 15 – 20 years surrounding the two referendums.  Perhaps he used Elvis Gratton as a catalyst for Québec to “get it all out”, on their movie and television screens, so that society could begin its own healing process.  After all, the referendums tore apart aspects of society, pitting segments of society against each other.   The fact that Pierre Falardeau used some of the most crass and politically incorrect plots and humour with which to make people laugh was perhaps the only way he felt he could compel society to look at these issues head on.

Regardless if my above take on Elvis Gratton is or is not correct, the movies were a monstrous success.  They were so successful and so popular that lines and language from the movies have been immortalized in every-day common Québec French (I have even used some of them myself in some earlier posts).   In this respect, lines and scenes from Elvis Gratton movies could be to Québec what the lines and scenes of Monty Python are to Great Britain.

Because Falardeau perhaps used the movies as his own substitute for a defacto “Truth & Reconcilliation Commission”, he took on issues as complex and sensitive as the chummy relationship between the federal Liberals and Power Corporation (a media corporation), how Québec viewed and treated visible minorities and immigrants, how sovereignists and federalists treated and viewed each other, how disabled people were viewed by society, religion’s place in society, how people seemingly followed ideologies like blind sheep without understanding what they were following, some of the least desirable aspects of marriage… and the list goes on.   He created comedic sketches making fun of all these matters, in the most crude and extreme ways – using the most crass language in French vocabulary.   But it made the masses pay attention, and laugh.   People laughed like you would not believe.  Years later, I know people who still recall Elvis Gratton scenes, and who continue laugh at them.

I’m not sure if you read my earlier post on “Sugar Sammy” (click HERE for it).   If you have not read it, I recommend you read it before reading the remainder of this post (it will put the following into perspective).

In the “Sugar Sammy” post, I made the specific point of emphasizing that laughter is the best medicine – especially when people can laugh at themselves.  In the Sugar Sammy post, I used the example of comedy + language politics to make the point.    However, in the case of Elvis Gratton, I’m using comedy + “sovereignty vs. federalism vs. society vs. everything else” to make the same point.  Laughter lets people heal, and it allows people to reconcile.  Under any other circumstances, the type of politically incorrect and controversial humour we saw in Elvis Gratton would have been condemned (after all, it contains repeatedly strong undertones of racist humour and other taboo topics).   But in this case, the movies were not condemned at large – probably because Falardeau did a great thing… he used his talents as a producer to portray these topics in a manner to invoke laughter for the sake of society’s healing.

I think these movies did serve their purpose, and they did allow Québec, at large, to heal and to come to terms with the turmoil and emotion which stemmed from the referendums.

One specific example I can give you was during the Bouchard-Taylor Commissions (it was a commission which explored the whole issue of reasonable accommodations in the context of multiculturalism and interculturalism)The commission suggested that Québec cease to use the expression “Québécois de souche” (“purebred Québécois”) when refering to anyone whose roots in Québec can be traced back to white settlers in the 1600s and 1700s.  Rather, the Bouchard-Taylor Commission suggested using the expression “French Canadian”.

Pierre Falardeau knew that these latter terms stirred up strong emotions from opposing aspects of society, almost to the point that it pitted certain groups against other groups, based on lines drawn by the opposing use of these expressions;  invoking notions of nationalism, federalism and sovereignty.  He therefore incorporated a puzzling mix of this confusing “identity” vocabulary into Elvis Gratton to come up with some of the funniest scenes.  Prior to these movies, society likely thought there would be no way they could ever laugh at such emotional and gut-wrenching issues.  But after the movies, everyone was laughing at these matters – to the point that many of these former “society-shredding matters” simply became cursory points of discussion.  That is a very powerful transition – by any definition.

The scene to which I’m referring to above can be viewed here:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lZS7sOOpELI.

From 2007 to 2009, for a period of three years, the movies were re-interpreted into a 3 year television sitcom.   The fact that Elvis Gratton made the jump from the big screen to television in no way diluted the crassness or political incorrectness of the scenes.   The television series was named “Bob Gratton” (not “Elvis Gratton”).  It aired on TQS (today known as Télé-Québec).  Again, I’m sure you’ll be able to find video clips of Bob Gratton online.

At the beginning of this post, I mentioned that Elvis Gratton’s place in Québec’s culture illustrates some of the best of what Québec is – the best of its people, the best of its society, and Québec’s deep concern for others, regardless of their backgrounds.

I said this because after Québec’s society had its emotional “release” through laughter, by way of these very politically incorrect movies and television, society never really re-embarked on making fun of such issues, at least at a societal level, ever again (issues which, under any other circumstances, should never be made fun of… i.e.:  it’s not OK to laugh at and make fun of people with cerebral palsy, such as the movies did with Bob Gratton’s side-kick friend Méo; nor is it ok to make fun of gay people, or Muslims, or developing countries and their people, etc. etc.).   And in this spirit, after Québec’s healing-period via Elvis Gratton, Québec put this kind of humour to rest.  It has never really crept back into Québec’s mainstream media again.   I think this shows that society knows how and when to put things into context.

In my blog series talking about Multiculturalism and Interculturalism, I spoke of “isolated” flare-ups of culturally sensitive matters, as well as political point-scoring by “lone” political camps.   But I truly cannot emphasize enough that these are just what I said:  “isolated” and “lone” scenarios.  They do not represent a tendency towards societal racism, intolerance, or bigotry.  On the contrary, Québec is one of the most welcoming, caring and warmest societies in the Western and developed world.  Québec may be soul-searching for the best way to integrate immigrants (and it may have its odd hiccups and growing pains), but frankly speaking, so too are Vancouver and Toronto, and other provinces have issues as they are dealing with these subjects.  But on the whole, we (as Canada as a whole or as Albertans, Manitobans, Québecois, or Newfoundlanders, as well as individual towns and cities) do a much better job of dealing with these matters than other parts of the world.  We tolerate and empathize with them more than most other countries in the world.  How Québec’s society has waded its way through these matters is truly commendable and remains a model for other societies which are undergoing rapid diversification while, at the same time, they are facing questions on how to best deal with serious, complex, and intense questions of cultural and heritage preservation.   All-in-all, Québec has pulled it off and continues to evolve.

We really have to be careful to differentiate lone political camps (ones who seek to capitalize on isolated instances from society at large) from society’s individuals who exercise the utmost humanity with which to build a compassionate, just and tolerant society.