Home » Posts tagged 'Liberals'

Tag Archives: Liberals

Philippe Couillard’s “premptive” damage control positioning and constitutional preps (#334)

The marriage of the “adrenaline-charged Super-Duo”, PKP (Pierre Karl Péladeau, the head of the Parti Québécois) and Julie Snyder (Québec’s best known super-star celebrity), this weekend was a reminder to all that the 2018 Québec election will be squarely about Québec independence.

Premier Philippe Couillard knows that this will be the #1 topic coming from the lips of the PQ for the next few years (a major shift from the past which saw the PQ be just as pre-occupied about subjects of day-to-day governance as the Liberals and CAQ).

The turfing of the Bloc Québécois leader a couple months ago, Mario Beaulieu, by his own party (and presumably by PKP) and the resurrection of Gilles Duceppe has shown to what extent the sovereigntist movement is prepared to go to in order achieve their goal.

Under PKP’s leadership, the entire movement is beginning to resemble more and more an extremely slick, well ran, and super-competitive board-room or corporation (of the likes of Wal-Mart when it tries to run all other competitors out of town), rather than that of a political party.

This is new.  We have never seen something like this before.

Although it continues to be new to the extent th at it has not yet found “solid” traction with the electorate, there have been polls which have shown a slight increase in support for the PQ and sovereignty (hovering around 35% or 40% at its highest.  But the numbers remain quite low considering that the figures group soft sovereigntists — who are less inclined to vote “yes” during a referendum, which would probably bring a “YES” to under the numbers I just provided….  But 35% still isn’t a number to laugh at).

Update 2015-08-20 – A new CROP poll today shows that the PQ’s support has fallen to 29% (35% for Francophones) in the days following the PKP/Snyder marriage.  Pierre Karl Péladeau’s personal popularity took a nose dive to 23%.  Perhaps people are seeing after all that the PKP/Snyder’s Party will only be about one topic, and perhaps people have had enough … for now.  The Liberals are only slightly ahead.

Three years can be an eternity in politics, and 2018 could be enough time for the movement to bounce back if the “corporation’s” PQ’s business political plan is effective.

Since 1995, the most effective method Federalist parties have invoked to avoid mass sovereigntist sentiments from reigniting has been to avoid a Federal-Provincial clash between Ottawa and Québec – especially one involving constitutional matters.

Both the Chrétien/Martin Liberals and the Harper Conservatives were of the opinion that slow and stable civil-service governance, and tackling each issue as it arrives (without opening the constitution) was the best way to prevent a show-down or constitution crisis.  I also have to admit that the fact that Harper has kept a very tight reign on the flow of information has probably, and ironically, helped somewhat too (in the sense that it has likely avoided unintentional slips-of-the-tongue from backbencher MP’s… especially preventing comments which could have inflamed sovereignist politicians and debate).

The Chrétien/Martin Liberals, and the Harper Conservatives firmly took a stand that a large degree of national reform could be achieved “on-the-ground” via small adjustments over time (supported by Common Law at the courts) rather than through re-opening the constitution.   In this sense, the constitution, its interpretations, and its application has been able to keep up with the times — turning it into a “living” document, without ever having to change the document’s wording or provisions.

They were of the view that the constitution could be re-opened at a date in the distant future once enough incremental “administrative” and “legal” reforms had occurred over a number of years (or decades) on the ground.  Thus, when it would come time to re-open the constitution, it would have simply been a matter of “updating it” to reflect “already-existing” realities (rather than having it “create new realities” in and of itself).

So far, this approach from Ottawa seems to have worked (on many levels, independent of one’s political affirmations or party beliefs).  It has been good for governance, good for Canada, and good for Québec.

Just as importantly, it had completely taken the wind out of the sails of the Parti Québécois and the Bloc Québécois.  It had given them nothing to grab on to – and a few times the movement had come to the edge of collapsing.

But lo and behold, something has changed this year.  It appears that both Mulcair’s NDP has expressed its desire to try to re-open the constitution (although Trudeau’s has  not expressed a desire to open the consitution on the campaign trail, he has said in his book that he would support such a move in the right “time and place”).

Trudeau’s book “Common Ground” talks in length about his disappointment in that Québec has not signed the constitution.  He did not necessarily believe in Meech or Charlottetown, but he did say that the constitution will have to be re-opened and signed by Québec eventually (something I also say).  But you get the feeling that his “right time and place” may be sooner than later.  I say this because the book gives you the impression that wants this whole issue to go away as fast as possible, and that he believes his terms will be the right ones.  Thus, if elected PM?  (Oh, Oh – there just might be a new constitutional round, and that could mean trouble).

Mulcair has even gone so far as to campaign on the issue of re-opening the constitution in order to abolish the senate (Oh crap – big trouble!).

Their intentions (Trudeau’s and Mulcair’s) might be good, but the timing could not be worse.

They would be putting Premier Couillard in a very difficult position, and they would be picking a fight with PKP-Snyder, as well as with PKP-Snyder’s grasp on Québec’s media, pop-culture elite, and their board-room games to capture the hearts and minds of Québec.

P.Coui1

Above;  Premier Philippe Couillard… If you’re not familiar with him, take a good look now, because if Mulcair or Trudeau (or both of them together) try to re-open the constitution, it will be this man’s face which you will see plastered all over English Canada’s news for the next several years as he tries to keep Canada together.

Although Premier Couillard is the most Federalist premier Québec has possibly ever had, such actions on the part of Trudeau or Mulcair would thrust Couillard into the political battle of not only his life, but possibly for the survival of Canada.

A new round of constitutional discussions would be messy – very very messy.

It would not be as clear-cut as what Mulcair says (and Trudeau isn’t letting us know what he would throw on the table – but if his book is any indicator, it could quite possibly be everything, since he seems to want to change everything [remember that Mansbridge interview a few years ago when Trudeau said he want to, quote “change the world”?] ).

  • This would result in the PQ crying for everything to be put on the table at a new round of constitutional negotiations (which is impossible to do), otherwise they would shift into war mode to raise emotional tensions to the maximum with which to convince Québécois to vote to leave Canada,
  • BC, AB, and SK would have their own demands (Christie Clark, Rachel Notley, and Brad Wall have all hinted they want bigger roles and controls (code for constitutional changes) for their provinces).
  • Ontario (under Kathleen Wynn) says Ontario want new mechanisms to prevent Ottawa’s “lack of cooperation” on matters of importance to her government (with the new Ontario Retirement Pension Plan being a prime example).
  • And then there are the Atlantic Provinces which would likely want their own constitutional provisions to counter the effects of what they believe is the “fight of their lives” to retain political relevance at the national level (as their populations continue to shrink as people move West).

This could not be better news for the PQ and the PKP-Snyder duo.  They must be salivating at the prospect of a possible Mulcair led government (and it would be even better for them if it is a minority government with Mulcair as PM and Trudeau as head of the official opposition – thus paving the way for re-opening the constitution, a demonizing of Canada, and emotions getting the better of everyone – including the public).

Last weekend was the Québec Provincial Young Liberals convention.  Premier Couillard is well aware of the unfolding situation which I just described.

True to his brain-surgeon style, Philippe Couillard is a strategist hors-pair.  At the Liberal convention, he announced that he will “not concede an inch to the sovereignists”.  

For the very first time, we have just seen Couillard shift into high gear anti-sovereigntist mode – that of pre-emptive damage control.

He knows that should the Federal NDP or Liberals come to power in October (as a minority or majority government), they may try to re-open the constitution.

Couillard wants to be ready and have his ducks all in place.

This weekend, he asked Liberal delegates to “quickly” (within hours) give him a short-list of what they would want to see added to the constitution should it be re-opened.  Precisely, he asked them “What is Québec’s role in Canada?”

Do not forget that Couillard is 100% pro-Canada.

His convictions make it so he would do anything to avoid hurting the federation.  He would want any propositions to work for his own electorate and all people in Québec, as well as for everyone else across the country.  In fact, at the Liberal congress, he delivered a fiery speech against sovereignty – one which carried an overtone which would have anyone believe we were already in full referendum mode.  

Thus his question to provincial Liberal delegates should not be viewed as something negative by the rest of Canada.

When he posed the question to delegates, he asked them to bear in mind issues such as:

  • Equalization program,
  • Health payment transfers,
  • Economic development file, such as infrastructure, Northern development, and Maritime strategies.

These are all soft (and safe) issues.  They are issues people across Canada can agree on.

Couillard also asked federal party leaders to make clear their stance on how they view Québec in Canada.  (After all, if he’s going to stick his neck out to confront the PKP-Snyder offensive, and if Mulcair & Trudeau are going to back him into a corner by forcing him to confront PKP-Snyder, he naturally wants Trudeau and Mulcair to also step up to the plate, to put their money where their mouths are, and to take some responsibility for their own words and actions).

The delegates gave Couillard their thoughts, and he sent off a letter to all Federal party leaders with his views on what he believes needs to be reviewed in the constitution:

  • Senate reform
  • Supreme Court judge nominations
  • Limitations on Federal spending in the areas of provincial jurisdiction,
  • A veto vote for any other constitution changes.

When elected in September 2014, Couillard told Harper that he would like to see Québec eventually sign the Canadian Constitution.  Ever since 1982, the fact that Québec has never signed the constitution has been the “raison d’être” and free wind in the sails for the sovereignty movement – precisely the ammo the PQ was always used to argue their point.

Couillard wants to put this to rest once and for all.

But as you can see, re-opening the constitution is a double-edged sword.

So while the rest of the country is talking about things such as whether Toronto should or should not host the 2024 Olympics, whether it should be illegal for regular citizens to transport wine from Halifax to Fredericton in their cars, or whether Alberta should or should not regulate the flavour of chocolate, Philippe Couillard is already beginning to fight the political fight of his life, and that of the future of Canada.

Owing to the fact that others in Canada do not seem to know what is happening, I just hope the rest of Canada does not (innocently and naïvely) act too surprised, offended, or dare I say “angry” when all of this suddenly comes to the fore should a new government in Ottawa try to do something risky such as “prematurely” (or foolishly) reopen the constitution at this point in time — or at the very minimum, before Couillard specifically tells Ottawa, and all the provinces (after back-door discussions) that he’s ready to go forward and safely deal with all of this.

After all, the rest of Canada will have had had someone in Québec who has long since been trying to do his damndest to avert what could have easy been a catastrophe had anyone else been at the helm.

What can I say… The two solitudes (Sigh).


Edit:  An earlier version say that Trudeau was disappointed with the failure of Meech and Charlottetown.  What I meant to say that he was disappointed with the “wording” of Meech and Charlottetown which lead to its failure (meaning his own deal, if he were dealing with the issues, would have proposed quite different matters to entice Québec to sign the constitution… or he would have waited for another time to open the constitution).  I corrected my post.

Québec’s 20 most trusted individuals: 10th and 11th positions [post 6 of 11] (#261)

Let’s kick off the second half of the list of the 20 most trusted people in Québec.

# 10  Philippe Couillard –

The last post contained the first appearance of a politician in the list.   The second highest ranked politician on the list enters this list – and it is none other than Québec’s own sitting Premier, Philippe Couillard (Liberal), who takes the #10 spot.

I’m not going to go into all of his biographical information.  Rather, I’ll try to sum up why I believe he is the highest ranked “provincial” politician in this list.

Couillard been Québec’s Premier for just a little over one year (having taken the premiership in April 2014).  In politics, one year can be a lifetime.  Yet Couillard still maintains the top spot as the most trusted provincial politician in Québec.  Poll after poll of the last few months also indicate he is the most “popular” politician of the most “popular” party (the provincial Liberals).

It is a honeymoon which has not yet quite faded (but which is being met with some challenges).

Why is this?  I have my own pet theories, and I can share some of them with you.

  1. Couillard is viewed as someone who is trying to get the average Québécois out of a financial squeeze. Québec is one of the highest taxed, most indebted, and most bureaucratic jurisdictions in North America.   Despite generous social programs which provide a well-supported “lift” for certain sectors of society (particularly families), the middle-class has been financially squeezed.   It is a financial pressure which average people could feel.

With a rapidly aging population, low birth rates and low levels of immigration (when compared to a few other provinces), a growing debt, and low rates of new business growth/investment, people could see that the squeeze would get even worse.

Apart from a growing debt, just prior to Couillard taking the reins of power, there was talk in the wind of a debt rating downgrade which would have increased the costs of servicing the debt.  The result would have meant that the average person would have been squeezed even further.

A brain surgeon by training, Philippe Couillard took a surgical view to remedying the problem.  He sought to make cuts and some structural changes to the government, civil service and bureaucracy to balance the budget.   Many critics have called the measures of austerity.  Yet, I’m not sure his measures met the popular definition of austerity.  Rather, I think in most people’s minds, his measures were viewed as “short-term-pain for long-term-gain”.  They were budget cuts (with accompany restructurings to be able to achieve the cuts); but just enough to get rid of the deficit and to be able to post modest surpluses.

To put it into perpective:  On the budget control scale, you have

  • splurging on one end,
  • budget cuts / balancing / restructuring in the middle, and
  • austerity’s slash-and-burn / government dismantlement on the other end).

In Greece and Cyprus, we saw austerity.  In Italy, we saw “near austerity”, in Alberta in 1993 we saw “near austerity” (with a 22% decrease in the size of government following the Klein cuts).   What we have seen in Québec over the past year has been nothing close to the “popular” definition of austerity (I think less than a 5% reduction in government expenditures if I am not wrong, but accompanied with an actual growth in government size by about 1 or 2%).

I think that ordinary people recognize this does not constitute the “popular” definition of “austerity”.

I also think they recognized that the “rebalancing” measures Couillard has taken are likely to bear fruit in some form or another (it only took him one year to balance the budget – another clear sign that it was not structural, year-after-year long-term austerity).

 I believe this is one of the reasons why people trust Couillard.

2.     I believe there is one other big reason why people trust him.

Yes, Couillard is a politician.  Let there be no doubt about it.  He strategizes and plays the game like all politicians.   But he does not seem to get caught up in trying to force trending-ideologies down people’s throats, or social-engineering in order to gain power.

After everything people in Québec went through with the student strikes of 2012 (and the short-lived student “fart” of 2015), after the social divisiveness people felt from the PQ’s proposed Charte des Valeurs, and after what people perceive as an “tired” ideological battle involving the sovereignty movement, I think people have been “ok” with Couillard’s refusal to engage in such politics (people might not be overjoyed with Couillard, but he’s acceptable in people’s minds).

This does not mean that everyone agrees with Couillard’s style of politics or decisions, but it does mean that there is a large enough portion of the population who would prefer Couillard’s style over others.  Enough at least that Couillard is considered Québec’s most trusted provincial politician.

#11  Chantal Hébert –

This is one of the people who I would personally have placed in the top three.   But the #11 spot is not so bad either.

Regardless if you are Anglophone or Francophone, if you watch the news anywhere in Canada in either language, you already know Chantal Hébert.   Thus, there is not much of an explanation needed on my part.   She is likely high up there in the trust level of most people across Canada (and not just in Québec).

But I will offer you some fillers.

She is one of Canada’s best known political commentators.   She is a regular on the CBC, as well as both the television and radio divisions of Radio-Canada.  Hébert has a column in the Toronto Star, and another in Le Devoir.   More recently, she has been a best-selling author.  (And then there are those memorable light-hearted parodies of the last couple decades which we’ve all laughed at across Canada).

She is known for her straight talk and unbiased opinions.  What I love about her is that she has no qualms about holding back the way she sees things, and will support her views with anecdotal observations and facts.

Here is an example of what I mean:

She will sometimes make an appearance on television programs to give an unbiased opinion.  But the audience and host are known to have a bias.  In such circumstances, the host will set up a question so that he / she expects the answer to play into their own bias.  But yet Hébert will come out with the most unexpected, objective answer – leaving everyone to eat humble pie.  You can’t imagine how many times I have laughed out loud at such situations.

Here is a case in point:  Last Sunday, Hébert was an invitee on the Radio-Canada talk show Tout le monde en parle (TLEMP).  This show has the second highest television ratings in all of Québec and Canada (behind TVA’s La Voix).    It’s a program which has a reputation for being “biased” towards the left, the Québec nationalist movement, and sovereignist guests (although I have to admit that I have seen quite noticeable effort on the part of the hosts to appear less biased over the past two to three years… credit where credit is due).  Regardess, the show attracts a certain studio audience.

On last Sunday’s show, the host’s (anti-Conservative) panel took a shot at Prime Minister Harper for having started the trend in Canadian politics of locking out the media with an information blackout.   From the expression on the faces of the audience, you could see that the audience loved such a comment (as did the other panelists).

But then Hébert quickly pointed out that it was actually Lucien Bouchard and the Bloc Québécois which started the trend of controlling the media message in Canadian politics, and Harper simply learned from the Bloc Québécois.   You should have seen the sour looks on everyone’s faces when they heard the facts which Hébert presented to them.  I couldn’t help but laugh out loud.  She took the wind out of everyone’s sails in her usual calm, composed style.

On the same show, but back in 2013, the host and panelists again took shots at the Conservatives for being information control freaks, and for being information manipulators.  They took temendous joy in criticizing the Conservatives of twisting facts to portray an inaccurate reality to the electorate (I don’t necessarily disagree with them — but they were having more fun with their Harper-bashing then a kid on Halloween, owing to a tad bit too much of an ultra-nationalist discourse).   But what happened next left everyone speechless, before a television audience of 2.3 million people.

Hébert began to cite example after example of the types of tricks certain politicians undertake to control information so as to manipulate public perception and views.  She talked about how scientific evidence is suppressed, about how statistics are manipulated, about how messages are distorted and then force fed to the public using government funds.  She went on and on, listing this this, that, and all the rest.

As she went down a lists of the sneaky, dirty tactics which she feels Québec is falling victim to, everyone in the room (mostly pro-PQ supporters) were nodding their head in complete agreement.  The grins on their faces said it all.  They all agreed the tactics Hébert listed were the lowest of the low, and the sneakiest of political moves.

But then Hébert put a name to who she was talked about… and it was not the name anyone expected (they all thought she was talking about Stephen Harper).  Hébert said all of these things were exactly what Pauline Marois had been doing as the head of the Parti Québécois. 

You should have seen the shock and horror on everyone’s faces when they realized that Hébert was talking about the Parti Québécois and not the Conservatives.  To make matters worse for this traumatized group, Hébert supported her arguments with examples and facts!   You could see that the pro-Parti Québécois audience and panelists were mortified by the fact that they had all just agreed, inadvertently (and in front of 2.3 million people), that their own party was up to a bunch of dirty tricks.

It was hilarious !!!

And that, my friends, is precisely why people in Québec trust Chantal Hébert.  She calls it as she sees it.

Chantal Hébert is only one of two people on this list of 20 who is not from Québec.

Most people in Québéc are not aware that she is not originally Québécoise, but is actually Franco-Ontarian (although she lives in Québec now).  She was born in Ontario, was educated in Ontario (at Glendon College in Toronto), started her career in Ontario, and worked for much of her life in Ontario (she used to work as a reporter covering Queens Park in Toronto).   This little tid-bit of info is something which usually takes a number of Québécois by surprise when they hear it

Coincidentally, just yesterday, a friend from Laval (Québec) and I were talking about the Alberta election results.  We both gave a nod to the fact that Chantal Hébert’s predictions were dead on.  My friend said to me “See… there’s one Québécoise who knows lots about Alberta.”  I answered “She certainly knows her stuff, but she’s actually from Ontario.”  My buddy from Québec was shocked.   (I guess he must have thought “I was the only one” from outside Québec… hahaha).

Regardless, people can’t get enough of her – which is why everyone always whats to hear from her.   Regardless if she is originally from Québec or not, in most people’s hearts in Québec, she’s part of the family – and they trust her.

In the next post, we’ll look at a very “interesting” investigative reporter, and the host of one of the biggest talk shows in the country (both of these people are tied into others figures already discussed in this list).   See you soon!

Les publicités négatives 2015 / 2015 Attack ads (#229)

Avec un peu moins de 200 jours avant l’élection fédérale, je remarque déjà une différence de style entre les publicités négatives. 

With around 200 days to go until the Federal election, I’m already noticing a difference in styles and focus in attacks ads.

Quatre des partis s’attaquent les uns les autres — mais au moins ces attaques visent les enjeux qui ont rapport à nos vies quotidiennes, et celles de nos enfants à l’avenir… …

Four of the parties are attacking each other, but at least on issues which concern our daily lives, and those of our children in the future… …

Ci-dessous – Exemple d’une publicité conservatrice contre les libéraux

(Below – Example of Conservative ads against the Liberals)

c.on.atq.1

Ci-dessous – Exemple d’une publicité libérale contre les conservateurs

(Below – Examples of Liberal ads against the Conservatives)

l.ib.atq.2

Ci-dessous – Exemple d’une publicité néo-démocrate contre les conservateurs

(Below – Example of NDP ads against the Conservatives)

n.dp.atq.3

Ci-dessous – Exemple d’une publicité des Verts contre les autres partis politiques

(Below – Example of Green ads against all the other parties)

v.er.atq.4

————————————

Et puis, il y a un parti qui se démarque par ses attaques contre… … et ben… le monde”!

And then there’s that one party which stands out for its attacks against… well… “the world”!

Exemple des publicités du Bloc. —— Mais en toute honnêté, chu pas sûr que c’est le NPD qu’elle vise

Example of ads from the Bloc.—— But I’m not sure it’s the NDP they’re truly targeting

b.loc.atq.5

Grand soupir, Il y en a toujours “une” dans la salle, n’est-ce pas?

Big sigh, there’s always “one” in the crowd, isn’t there!

————————————


Lien:  Comment gérer la colère d’un enfant ?

Link:  10 Great Books That Can Help an Angry Child

Le Multiculturalisme & l’interculturalisme: Des aspects controversés – billet 2 sur 2 (#187)

This is the French version of an earlier post, for Francophone followers of this blog.

Le dernier billet touchait sur ce qui constitue le multiculturalisme et l’interculturlisme.

Ce billet portera sur des aspects les plus controversés, notamment sur “les accommodements raisonnables” – une question qui a tendance à soulever les passions, non seulement au Québec, mais ailleurs au Canada aussi.  .

Certaines des questions les plus controversées survenant du multiculturalisme, de l’interculturalisme, et des accommodements raisonnables

Dans le dernier billet, je vous ai offert un exemple où la société a pu trouver moyen d’accommoder une demande culturelle d’un policier sikh, celle d’avoir son turban incorporé dans l’uniforme de la GRC (Gendarmerie royale du Canada).  Il s’agissait d’un exemple, suite à un certain niveau de débat, où la société serait prête à offrir des accommodements aux différences culturelles, et de façon très publique.  Faute d’un meilleur terme, les accommodements sont une espèce de “partage de l’espace publique” afin de permettre aux autres cultures de mettre en pratique leurs croyances et traditions.  Dans le contexte du multiculturalisme et de l’interculturalisme, la société canadienne et québécoise accordent des accommodements dans la mesure que les demandes sont présumées “raisonnables”.   Le terme exact s’appelle des “accommodements raisonnables”.

En effet, l’expression “accommodement raisonnable” est un terme juridique, reconnu par la Cour suprême du Canada.  Il a également fait l’objet d’études majeures (telle la Commission Bouchard-Taylor) sur ce qui constitue des accommodements raisonnables et ce qui repoussent les limites de ce que la population tolérerait (autrement dit, ce qui n’est pas raisonnable).

Certains pourraient prétendre que la question de porter un turban sikh, lorsqu’on exerce les fonctions de policier, s’agit d’un débat banal avec peu de controverse.

Oui, il est vrai qu’il existe des zones floues où les débats entourant les accommodements raisonnables peuvent devenir bien plus controversées.  La société sera toujours en train de débattre ces question, au niveau fédéral quand il s’agit du multiculturalisme, ou au niveau provincial au Québec quand il s’agit de l’interculturalisme – et ce, peu importe le gouvernement en place; que ce soit un gouvernement fédéral, un gouvernement au Québec, ou des gouvernements dans d’autres provinces.

Parmi les questions les plus controversées, quelques-unes qui ont surgi au cours des quelques dernières années sont les suivantes :

  • Dans des lieux de travail et dans des écoles aux cultures diversifiées, devrait-on remplacer le mot “Noël” par le mot “les fêtes”?
  • Devrait-on remplacer le mot “arbre de Noël” par le mot “arbre des festivités”?
  • Est-ce que les foulards qui couvrent le visage devraient être interdits lors des cérémonies de citoyenneté lorsqu’on prête serment de citoyenneté? (Il s’agit des niqabs ou burquas dans le cas d’une minorité de femmes musulmanes, ou les duppatas dans le cas d’une minorité des femmes hindous).  C’est une discussion qui est en train de se dérouler dans les coulisses de pouvoir à Ottawa – car il y a une femme qui en fait appel à la décision du gouvernement d’exiger le visage découvert lors du serment.
  • Est-ce qu’on devrait permettre certains éléments de la charia dans l’application du droit civil comme option au niveau de la législation provinciale (touchant le mariage, la divorce, l’inscription des noms, etc.)?
  • Est-ce qu’on devrait reporter ou rééchelonner des matchs de hockey pour prendre en compte le jour du sabbat des joueurs juifs?

La nature des éléments très controversés revient à la question suivante : Dans quelle mesure la grande majorité doit-elle être tenue d’accommoder des demandes rares ou anormales d’une petite minorité, surtout lorsqu’on constate que ces accommodements mèneraient à des changements aux modes de vie et aux traditions profondément enracinés, visibles, et symboliques de la majorité?  Après tous, de tels changements pourraient avoir d’importantes incidences et pourraient être ressentis par tous.  C’est dans ce contexte que la question des accommodements devient controversée, et pourrait impliquer tout le monde.

Je trouve ces débats très intéressants, et je comprends la controverse.  Je vous dirai d’ailleurs une chose — Je n’ai pas les réponses à toutes ces questions.  Mais voici la tendance, au cours des deux dernières décennies jusqu’à présent, telle que je la vois : les sociétés canadiennes anglophones et francophones semblent toutes les deux d’accord qu’un accommodement quelconque n’est plus raisonnable s’il transformerait les traditions de tout le monde, et si ce changement serait estimé être une transformation majeure.

Dans l’exemple du policier sikh, l’accommodement consenti au policier de porter un turban n’était pas un changement majeur qui impliquerait tout autre policier, ou la société dans son ensemble – précisément parce que d’autres policiers ne sont pas contraints de porter cette tenue religieuse.   En outre, le port du turban n’incommode pas, et il ne doit pas nécessairement alourdir ou perturber la vie quotidienne de la société.

En ce qui concerne la question de renommer “Noël”, j’ai l’impression que la société est hautement défavorable à cette idée, du moins dans le sens “collectif” ou au “nom de la société” (et c’est pour cette raison, en passant, pourquoi les publicités à la télévision, les évènements publiques, les marchés de Noël, etc. prononcent toujours, et prononcerons toujours le mot “Noël”).  Cependant, concernant la reconnaissance des fêtes au niveau de l’individu, nôtre société (francophone et anglophone) semble être confortable à l’idée de souhaiter une “joyeuse Hanouccah”, ou “Fête des lumières”, etc.  Nos écoles au Canada semblent elles aussi à l’aise d’enseigner que Noël et la saison des fêtes peuvent être interprétée différemment par différentes personnes.  Tout le monde reconnaît que la saison de Noël peut avoir de nombreuses significations différentes, et généralement on n’est pas vexé par la question lorsqu’on souhaite aux autres un joyeux Noël, une joyeuse Hanouccah, ou une joyeuse saison des fêtes (ce qui comprend le nouvel an et toute autre festivité).  Au niveau personnel, j’ai plusieurs amis musulmans qui célèbrent Noël eux aussi.  Ils me souhaitent un joyeux Noël, tout comme je le fait envers eux – et ces mêmes amis musulmans dressent même un sapin de Noël chez eux à la maison.

Le changement de nom des “arbres de Noël” s’est avéré bien plus controversé.  Ailleurs au Canada, à un moment donné il y avait quelques villes et écoles qui ont tenté officiellement les renommer des “arbres des fêtes”.  Pourtant, la réaction négative et le « contrecoup » de la population volaient aussi vite.  La réponse fut rapide et même furieuse.  Ces écoles et villes ont rapidement fait marche arrière, et depuis ce temps-là, cette question n’a pas réapparu à l’ordre du jour des débats publiques.  Contrairement au cas de “joyeuse saison des fêtes”, le débat entourant “l’arbre des fêtes” suscite bien plus d’émotions.   Sur ce sujet, je pense que nous avons atteint le point où la société voudrait absolument tracer une ligne dans le sable.  Ici, la population est moins inclinée d’accorder des accommodements aux revendications d’une très petite minorité qui préconise le changement de nom des arbres de Noël.  Je dirais qu’il s’agit d’un « contrecoup populaire » car un tel changement au nom des accommodements apporterait des modifications majeures aux traditions de la majorité – des traditions qui touchent tout le monde, et qui sont profondément enracinées dans la société.

Dans le cas des femmes qui doivent avoir le visage découverts lorsqu’elles prêtent serment de la citoyenneté, le gouvernement Conservateur (ainsi que le ministère de la citoyenneté) se dit inflexible quant à sa position et ses politiques d’interdire le visage voilé.  D’après ce que je suis en train de voir dans les médias, il me semble que les Conservateurs ont le sentiment publique de leur côté (au Canada anglophone et francophone, tous les deux).  Au cours des deux dernières journées, le NPD semble appuyer les Conservateurs, et la position des Libéraux fédéraux semblent être plus floue.   L’appui public s’explique probablement par le fait que la société estime que le serment de citoyenneté est une valeur partagée par nous tous (par la majorité tout comme par les minorités).  Il est donc “raisonnable” de conclure que tout le monde devrait être assujettit aux mêmes critères.

Il y a plusieurs années, il y avait une proposition en Ontario d’intégrer la charia dans certains aspects très minces du droit civil, tels les mariages, divorces, etc.  Elle ne visait que les cas où les parties concernées solliciteraient expressément l’application de la charia.  Toutefois, les préoccupations publiques contre une telle proposition se sont fait entendre très rapidement et elles étaient quasiment unanimes : Une telle mesure ne serait pas tolérée, et le gouvernement de l’Ontario a fait marche arrière.

Dans l’exemple des matchs de Hockey qui devaient être reportés ou rééchelonnés afin d’accommoder des joueurs juifs qui refusaient de jouer lors du sabbat (le vendredi et samedi), c’était en effet un cas qui est arrivé au Québec il y quelques années.  Un joueur avant-centre de l’équipe des Olympiques de Gatineau refusait jouer deux jours par semaine.   Pourtant, l’équipe et la ligue n’étaient pas prêtes à reporter les matchs, car un tel geste modifierait la saison dans son ensemble pour tout le monde à cause d’une seule personne.  Dans ce cas en particulier, l’accommodement de la majorité emportait sur l’accommodement d’une minorité infiniment petite.  J’avoue que je ne suis pas certain si le joueur en question aurait demandé que l’horaire des matchs soit modifié dans son ensemble.  Mais, de toute façon, la réaction publique contre la décision du joueur de “se retirer” des matchs deux fois par semaine était assez unanime pour inciter la direction de l’équipe de se prononcer et de lancer un ultimatum au joueur : c’est-à-dire décider de jouer le vendredi et samedi, ou quitter l’équipe.  À la fin de la saga, une solution d’accommodement grandement édulcoré a été trouvée.  L’équipe allait tolérer (accommoder) le retrait du joueur deux jours par semaine pendant les quelques semaines qui restaient de la saison en cours, uniquement afin de lui accorder le temps nécessaire de décider s’il voudrait ou non quitter l’équipe de manière permanente lors de la prochaine saison qui s’approchait.   Un tel accommodement était considéré raisonnable malgré tout.  À la fin du jour, le joueur en question s’est convenu de jouer tous les jours de la semaine s’il pouvait prendre congé trois jours par année durant les commémorations de Yom Kippur.  C’était une offre jugée acceptable pour toutes les deux parties et le tout était rapidement aplani.

Les accommodements raisonnables, sont-ils un “jeu à somme nulle”?

Les accommodements raisonnables, sont-ils un “jeu à somme nulle”?  C’est-à-dire, lorsqu’on accorde des accommodements, devrait-on les accommoder à 100%, ou rien du tout?  La réponse : Elle dépend les circonstances.   Le multiculturalisme et l’interculturalisme sont assez flexibles pour s’adapter aux meilleurs intérêts de la société, tout en étant en mesure de prendre en considération les revendications de la minorité (sur le fond, cette pratique est également la définition de la démocratie : la majorité emporte, mais tout en respectant les droits et les demandes raisonnables de la minorité).

Quant aux accommodements, dans certain des cas ci-dessus, il y avait des exemples de “jeu à somme nulle”, mais il comptait également des solutions de compromis (des deux côtés).  On voyait un “jeu à somme nulle” dans le cas de la sharia en Ontario et dans le cas de “l’arbre des fêtes” (franchement parlant, le Canada n’avait pas l’appétit d’engager sur cette voie).

Mais dans d’autres exemples, on a pu constater qu’il y avait des marges de maneouvre pour trouver des compromis.   Le cas du joueur de Hockey en est un exemple.  Au début, on pouvait croire qu’il serait un jeu à somme nulle (accepter de jouer sept jours sur sept, ou quitter l’équipe).  Mais à terme, c’était les trois jours annuels du Yom Kippur que le joueur tenait plus à cœur, et l’équipe s’est accordé à dire qu’elle pouvait lui accorder ces trois jours.  De lui accorder ces trois jours ne représenterait pas un accommodement déraisonnable.

Un autre exemple de ce type de question qui pourrait générer des questions nuancées est celui de prêter serment de citoyenneté à visage découvert.   Pour beaucoup de femmes qui portent un voile qui couvre le visage, il est acceptable de découvrir le visage en présence d’une autre femme, des membres mâles de la famille, ou les figures d’autorité (police, juges, médecins, etc.).  Cependant, il est vrai qu’un problème surgit quand les membres du publique, qui n’ont rien à faire avec la femme en question, peuvent voir son visage (et plus en particulier, des hommes).    En ce qui concerne comment cette question va se résoudre au cours des mois et semaines à venir, d’après moi, on va probablement trouver un compromis – un accommodement “mitoyen” si vous voulez.    Je ne serais pas étonné de voir si la femme en questions pourrait se tenir debout au fond de la salle, derrière tout le monde, mais avec le visage découvert orienté vers le juge (homme ou femme) en avant de la salle lorsqu’elle prête le serment de citoyenneté.  Une telle configuration en fera que personne d’autre dans la salle ne serait en mesure de voir son visage découvert, et elle aurait l’occasion de se “revoiler” le visage dès qu’elle aurait prononcé le dernier mot du serment.    Nous avons déjà un système semblable en place pour la prise de photo du permis de conduire et du passeport (on se cache derrière une cloison avec le photographe lors de la prise de photo – mais hors de vue des étrangers).  Bref, des concessions mutuelles peuvent égaler des accommodements raisonnables.

Comme vous pouvez le constater, certains accommodements raisonnables du multiculturalisme et de l’interculturalisme peuvent être noir ou blanc, ou ils peuvent être toutes les nuances de gris entre ces deux extrêmes.  Tout dépend les questions à trancher et le niveau de confort de la société envers ces enjeux.   Mais c’est ça la beauté de l’affaire : le multiculturalisme et l’interculturalisme vont rarement aussi loin d’accommoder des questions réputées “déraisonnables” par la société canadienne anglophone ou francophone du Québec (du moins j’espère que non).   Et de plus, le Canada anglophone et le Québec francophone sont d’accord à 99% du temps sur ce qui constitue des accommodements “raisonnables” et “déraisonnables”.

Je me casse la tête pour trouver des différences entre les deux sociétés, en termes de points de vue (des désaccords entre ce qui constitue un accommodement “raisonnable” ou “déraisonnable”), mais j’ai de la difficulté à y trouver.    Je peux penser à des cas exceptionnels au niveau des individus, tel l’affaire des vitres givrées d’une gym à Outremont il y quelques années (pour tenir des femmes qui s’y entrainaient hors de vue des juifs hassidim du quartier), mais ces exemples on rapport aux décisions prises au niveau d’un individu, et non pas de la société.  De telles décisions n’ont rien à faire avec le multiculturalisme ou l’interculturalisme (mais je me rappelle que dans le temps, les médias ont complètement confondu cette affaire avec le multiculturalisme et l’interculturalisme).   Je suppose que le fait que je n’arrive pas à trouver des conflits sur le front du multiculturalisme entre ce que pensent les sociétés anglophones et francophones (et je connais les deux assez bien) dénote que les deux sociétés pensent et agissent de la même manière quant à ces questions.

Pendant que le Canada et le Québec ne cesse de se diversifier, quel sera l’avenir dans le contexte du multiculturalisme et l’interculturalisme?

Bon, les scenarios ci-dessus ne sont que quelques exemples parmi d’autres qui font sujet de débats publiques.  À mesure que le Canada diversifie, je ne sais pas à quel point ces questions continueront ou cesseront d’être pertinentes.  Je suppose qu’il y a deux façons de les voir :

  1. D’un côté, plus le Canada devient diversifié, plus la population est en position de constater l’intérêt de préserver notre héritage, nos traditions, et notre patrimoine séculaire comme une fin en soi. On pourrait dire que le Canada serait moins riche, culturellement parlant, si nos traditions à longue durée disparaissent ou serait réduites.   Il pourrait arriver que l’ensemble des communautés diverses au Canada se réunissent de concert avec la majorité afin de préserver les traditions de longue durée ainsi que les traditions et le patrimoine du pays – et ce, même si ce patrimoine ne fait pas partie des traditions des communautés spécifiques.  En effet, il a y certaines indices qui démontrent le début d’une telle tendance.
  2. Du revers de la main, une diversification accrue des cultures pourrait continuer en même temps que l’on constate une réduction du nombre de traditions canadiennes/québécoises d’autrefois. Mais attention – réfléchissez à deux fois avant de tirer des conclusions hâtives.   On pourrait quand-même dire qu’un tel phénomène est une évolution naturelle, car toute société change au cours du temps.  C’est justement pour cette raison que les traditions célébrées au Canada en 1600 auraient cessé d’être célébrées de la même manière (ou même célébrées du tout) en 1800, une époque bien avant les vagues de diversification de notre société.  De même, il est fort probable que les traditions célébrées en 1950 ne seront plus célébrées de la même manière en 2050.  Ces deux dates ne sont pas si loin d’aujourd’hui.  Mais c’est quand-même un écart de 100 ans, une période dans laquelle on pourrait s’attendre voir tout un tas de changements de traditions – surtout avec la globalisation, et le fait que nous vivons plus longtemps pour constater ces changements nous-même (car notre espérance de vie est bien au-delà des 35ans d’il y a 150 ou 200 ans).   Oui, la diversification ethnoculturelle du Canada pourrait jouer un rôle dans ces changements, mais il faut être conscient du fait que la diversification ethnoculturelle, et les accommodements raisonnables, ne sont pas nécessairement les causes profondes de ces changements (en raison du fait que les traditions évoluent et changent, peu importe le niveau de la diversification de la société).

En résumé :

Le multiculturalisme et l’interculturalisme sont des sujets intéressants, et j’espère que ces perspectives pourraient inciter à la réflexion.

Lorsqu’on parle du rôle que jouent le multiculturalisme et l’interculturalisme au Québec et au Canada, il est très important de comprendre ce qu’ils sont, et de bien comprendre les définitions de ces deux idéologies.  Beaucoup de nos chroniqueurs, nos journalistes, nos médias, nos politiciens, et même nos intellectuels adorent dramatiser ce sujet.  Mais plus souvent, j’ai l’impression qu’ils ne comprennent même pas les notions et les concepts de bases avant qu’ils ne prennent leurs micros et qu’ils appuient sur la détente.

On voit même certains camps qui font de leur mieux pour déformer les faits, et pour diaboliser le multiculturalisme afin de marquer des buts politiques — surtout

  1. dans certains camps politiques lorsqu’ils disent que le multiculturalisme est incompatible avec la société québécoise (mais curieusement, ils omettent de dire que le multiculturalisme s’est évolué pour refléter et incarner la société québécoise même), et
  2. parmi tous les partis politiques lorsqu’ils pratiquent de l’opportunisme pur, sur le dos de certains évènements, afin de faire grimper leur parti dans les sondages de un ou deux points.

Lorsque vous entendez des chroniqueurs célèbres, des hôtes d’émissions très populaires de télévision, des politiciens, ou des acteurs/actrices/chanteurs s’attaquer au multiculturalisme, je vous encourage à bien examiner les preuves, d’examiner les enjeux, de revisiter les définitions de l’idéologie, et de mettre le tout dans son contexte.  Nous vivons dans une société sûre et civilisée, malgré tout.   Gardons-la ainsi!

————————————————————

COMPLETE SERIES:  MULTICULTURALISM AND INTERCULTURALISM (8 POSTS)

Le Multiculturalisme & l’interculturalisme: Le concept expliqué – billet 1 sur 2 (#186)

This is the French of an earlier post, for Francophone readers of this blog

J’ai récemment écrit un couple de billets en anglais au sujet du multiculturalisme et de l’interculturalisme.

  • Le premier touchait sur ce qui constitue le multiculturalisme et l’interculturlisme.
  • Le deuxième portait sur des aspects les plus controversés de ces idéologies.

Je vais vous offrir une version de ces deux billets en français, car je crois qu’ils traitent à des sujets que beaucoup gens au Québec (tout comme ailleurs au Canada) comprennent très mal (du moins ce sujet semble être mal compris dans les médias et par la plupart des gens que je connais).

L’objectif de ces billets sera de rapprocher les deux solitudes, car le multiculturalisme canadien est souvent associé, dans la tête des gens, à un concept déconnecté et dissocié de la réalité de la politique de l’interculturalisme québécois — surtout avec la réalité sociale sur le terrain.  Cependant, rien ne saurait être plus éloigné de la vérité.

Multiculturalisme

Le multiculturalisme s’agit d’une politique gouvernementale dont de nombreux pays de par le monde se dotent.  Il s’agit d’un concept légal, mais qui peut être interprété différemment par différents pays.

(J’arrête ici pour un moment, car il faut que je clarifie quleque chose avant de continuer… la définition et l’application du multiculturalisme en Allemagne, en France, en Grande-Bretagne, aux États-Unis, en Australie et ailleurs est différente de la définition et les pratiques au Canada – alors, il ne faut absolument pas confondrer les évènements, et les manières de leur application outremer avec l’équivalent en sol canadien).

Au Canada, nous avons une loi qui s’appelle la Loi sur le multiculturalismeLa définition canadienne s’applique partout au Canada, y compris au Québec, et elle est équitablement applicable à nous tous.  Conformément à la Loi sur le multiculturalisme, le multiculturalisme :

  • permet aux Canadiens de conserver leur héritage ethnoculturel (comme bon leur semble),
  • permet à tout un chacun, sans égard à leur héritage culturel, de participer pleinement à la société canadienne, sans discrimination,
  • reconnaît les communautés qui ont contribué à bâtir le Canada, et il contribue à renforcer le développement desdites communautés.
    • (En termes pratiques, cela pourrait signifier le financement fédéral à la construction d’un monument qui rend hommage aux Irlandais qui ont perdu leur vie dans le naufrage du paquebot Empress of Ireland dans le St-Laurent, le financement du village du patrimoine culturel ukrainien en Alberta, le financement du site historique du Fort Chambly, ou le financement à travers le pays de divers festivals gastronomiques multiethniques ou de musique multiethniques).
  • augmente l’usage du français et l’anglais par toutes et tous, mais en même temps permet aux communautés culturelles de garder leur propres langues s’ils le souhaitent.
    • (C’est pour cette raison qu’il existe des programmes à financement fédérale à l’échelle du pays, afin d’offrir des cours de français ou d’anglais aux immigrants – étant entendu que les immigrants utiliseront la langue de la majorité (le français au Québec et en Acadie, et l’anglais ailleurs) au travail et à l’école, de même que leurs enfants qui grandissent dans la société canadienne. C’est aussi pour cela que nos institutions gouvernementales, telles nos hôpitaux, nos écoles, nos palais de justice et nos bureaux ne fonctionnent qu’en français ou en anglais (selon la région ou la province).  C’est aussi pourquoi les interactions publiques dans un cadre officiel ne sont offertes que dans ces deux langues, et pas dans d’autres, sauf dans certaines exceptions superficielles aux sujets anodins.  Les programmes de bilinguisme officiel, tel l’éducation d’immersion française pour les anglophones, tombent eux aussi sous cette bannière).

En un mot, cela couvre déjà la grande partie de quoi consiste le multiculturalisme.  Au fond, ce n’est pas compliqué du tout.  Il n’y a rien de sournois, et il traite surtout aux sujets qui n’ont rien de “controversé”.  À la base, le Canada permet aux gens à vivre tout simplement, comme le ferait toute personne – et tout comme nous et nos voisins en souhaiterions vivre au quotidien.

Pour la grande majorité des immigrants et leurs descendants, cela signifie dans la pratique la notion de ne pas s’en servir des lois “injustes” contre ceux qui désirent vivre à leur façon.  Cela veut dire que des mesures extrêmes ne seront pas appliquées injustement contre les immigrants s’ils souhaitent retenir certains aspects de leur identité (j’entends par cela que le gouvernement ne peut pas s’en servir des amendes, des peines de prison, ou encore pire pour menacer les immigrant dans l’hypothèse qu’ils font des choses aussi innocentes et inoffensives telles que parler leur langue entre eux, ou de conserver des traditions culturelles dites normales et inoffensives).

Cela veut aussi dire que nous ne dirons pas aux immigrants qu’ils devront abandonner leurs coutumes, et dans la mesure du possible, nous accommoderons leurs coutumes parce que nous reconnaissons qu’ils ont eux aussi un rôle à jouer dans l’édification du pays.  Qu’il s’agisse d’accommodements simples et faciles, ou de mesures qui ne coûtent rien, ces accommodements généralement ne sont pas censés imposer un fardeau pour la société.  À titre d’exemple, les villes peuvent délivrer un permis de construction pour un nouveau temple sikh, un organisme peut louer un centre communautaire à un groupe chinois pour qu’il puisse célébrer le nouvel an chinois, des cafétérias d’écoles peuvent offrir des repas sans porc comme option aux étudiants musulmans, etc.  Toutes ces mesures sont très simples à implanter, et elles sont très raisonnables – mais aussi très naturelles.

Vous pouvez rétorquer que ces mesures vont de soi.  Mais il faut se rappeler que ces genres de libertés de base ne sont pas permis dans certains pays (en fait, elles ne sont pas permis dans beaucoup de pays).   Dans plusieurs pays, des musulmans ne peuvent pas prier selon leur religion et ils sont forcés à manger du porc dans les prisons et dans les écoles. Dans d’autres, il est interdit aux minorités ethniques de parler leur langue dans les lieux publics, dans les écoles ou dans les hôpitaux (ou même d’apprendre leur propre langue en école ou à l’université – une situation qui existe toujours dans certains régions en Europe de l’ouest même), et des gens ordinaires sont interdits de se convertir à une religion quelconque.  D’ailleurs, on interdit la délivrance des permis de construction si l’usage serait aux fins considérées culturelles ou religieuses, et dans certains pays, les regroupements des minorités ethniques sont interdits (c’est-à-dire les festivals gastronomiques multiethniques ou de musique multiethniques seraient strictement interdits).  La plupart des points que je viens de mentionner souscrit au concept d’assimilation (une idéologie complètement à part et très restrictive).

Dans de tels pays (parmi lesquels le Canada en compte de proches “alliés” et de “partenaires stratégiques”), ces personnes peuvent être condamnées à de lourdes amendes, voire à des peines d’emprisonnement, ou même pire tout simplement parce qu’ils participaient dans des activités qui seraient considérées normales au Québec et au Canada.  Nous, comme Québécois et Canadiens, nous pouvons nous aussi se voir passibles de lourdes peines si nous voyageons dans ces pays et si nous engageons dans des activités aussi anodines que de manger un repas de Noël avec des amis, de boire une bière, ou de porter des vêtements qui seraient considérés normales dans les rues de Drummondville ou Fredericton.

Alors, en bref, il n’y a rien de mauvais ou rien de choquant au sujet du multiculturalisme.  En termes simples, il fait en sorte que d’autres sont traités comme vous aimeriez qu’ils vous traiteraient si vous alliez vous déplacer dans un autre pays.  Un seul mot résume cette notion : “liberté”.

Là où les affaires deviennent floues, et où le publique a l’habitude d’entendre qu’il existe des problèmes concernant le multiculturalisme, il s’agit plutôt de rares cas isolés.  Dans ce même esprit, ces questions n’ont pas trait à la grande majorité des immigrants ou groupes minoritaires au Canada.  Cependant, puisqu’elles impliquent des cas plus rares, les médias parfois leur accordent une attention disproportionnée et excessive.  C’est pourtant précisément de cette façon que des petits récits deviennent instantanément et injustement une tempête dans un verre d’eau de proportions sensationnelles – au point même que certaines gens s’en servent des exemples médiatiques pour déclarer que le multiculturalisme est un échec total et irréparable.

Un des cas qui me vient immédiatement à l’esprit, c’est celui du policer sikh qui a pu porter son turban en uniforme avec l’approbation de la GRC (la Gendarmerie royale du Canada).  La GRC a trouvé une façon d’intégrer le turban dans l’uniforme de police.  Porte-il atteinte à une personne d’une façon quelconque?  Entrave-t-il l’exercice des fonctions de l’agent?  La réponse aux deux questions est non.  Heurte-il la susceptibilité de certaines personnes?  Pour la majorité des Canadiens, la réponse serait non, mais il risque d’y en avoir certaines qui ne seraient pas confortables.   On est mieux de laisser aux psychologistes la question pourquoi il pourrait froisser les esprits de certains (malgré tout, ce sont les psychologistes qui se spécialisent dans la question pourquoi il existe des gens qui se voient facilement perturbés).  Mais au fond, la GRC a reconnu la notion : “Traitez les autres comme vous voudriez vous-même être traité.”  Par conséquent, la décision de la GRC de permettre des officiers sikhs de porter le turban avec leur uniforme s’inscrivait dans l’esprit de la définition du multiculturalisme.

Dans ce même exemple, la réalité est celle-ci : un individu, qui se trouve à être aussi un sikh, a répondu à l’appel du devoir.  En raison de ce sens du devoir, cette personne voulait participer pleinement à la société, en tant que Canadien.  Il a donc décidé de se joindre à la GRC afin de protéger ma vie, ainsi que la vôtre.  S’il s’avérait nécessaire, il s’est dit prêt à sacrifier sa propre vie dans l’exercice de ses fonctions au nom de la sécurité et de la protection des Canadiens (encore, vous et moi).  J’en suis convaincu que si un jour il sacrifice sa vie pour protéger la vôtre, vous n’allez pas dire “J’aurais souhaité qu’il aurait enlevé son turban avant de sauver ma vie!”  Il faut garder les choses en perspective.  Tout ce qu’il a demandé en contrepartie, pour s’être joint à la GRC, était de pouvoir garder son turban dans le cadre de ses fonctions.  Et nous lui avons répondu oui.  Il est émouvant de penser qu’il croyait pouvoir, en tant que sikh, participer pleinement à la société canadienne, au point de se joindre à la GRC.  On y était reconnaissant, et on l’a accommodé.  Vu sous cet angle, c’est la preuve que le multiculturalisme marche.  Ce sont ces genres d’idéologies qui nous permettent de nous rassembler – tous ensemble – comme pays qui croit à l’inclusion.

Interculturalisme

La politique officielle du gouvernement du Québec est celle qui s’appelle l’interculturalisme”.  Il s’agit d’une variation de la même idéologie partagée à la base avec le multiculturalisme.  Alors, les deux sont très semblables, mais la principale différence étant que l’interculturalisme est présenté un peu différent, avec l’accent mis plus sur l’intégration, et bien sûr, il porte un “nom” différent.  La définition de la version québécoise, toute comme celle du fédérale, est bref et facile à comprendre.

Somme toute, l’interculturalisme :

  • invite aux groupes minoritaires de conserver leur héritage au Québec,
  • invite aux groupes d’exprimer leurs propres valeurs, et de vivre ces valeurs au Québec,
  • encourage les interactions entre les minorités ethnoculturelles, et entre la culture majoritaire francophone au Québec,
  • affirme que la langue commune du Québec est le français, et qu’elle en demeurera ainsi.

Voilà ce que c’est, en gros.  Tout est simple et court, il paraît non compliqué, et c’est une politique très ouverte.

Les similitudes entre le multiculturalisme et l’interculturalisme:

  • Étant donné que le Québec est une société francophone d’immigrants issus de divers horizons et d’origines différentes, il est par conséquent nécessaire que les immigrants doivent se conformer à la Charte des droits et libertés de la personne du Québec (qui, soit dit en passant, a servi de modèle pour la Charte canadienne des droits et libertés – la raison pour laquelle les deux sont très semblables et complémentaires). Les deux concepts impliquent que les immigrants contribuent à édifier le Québec (du point du vue social, et en ce qui concerne la langue et les coutumes) grâce à une collaboration avec le peuple du Québec.
  • Appliqué de façon globale et intégrée, la gestion du multiculturalisme au Québec va de pair avec l’interculturalisme québécois. Les deux idéologies ne sont pas des objectives antagonistes, et il n’y a pas d’affrontement idéologique (par ailleurs, jusqu’ici, rien ne permet d’affirmer que le contraire ne soit prouvé).
  • Les deux sont des idéologies pluralistes.
  • L’interculturalisme, tout comme le multiculturalisme, ne souscrit pas à une politique d’assimilation (personne n’est menacé par des amendes ou peines d’emprisonnement, et ce n’est pas prétendu qu’on doit rejeter son identité ethno-cultural afin de devenir exactement comme les Québécois ou Canadiens de souche. Tout ce qu’on demande, c’est qu’ils s’intègrent à la société – ce qui est jour et nuit face à l’assimilation).

Différences entre le multiculturalisme et l’interculturalisme:

  • Le Canada, à l’exception du Québec, ne compte pas de programmes d’apprentissage de langue institutionnalisés afin d’expressément intégrer les immigrants à la société majoritaire (Le Canada anglais compte des programmes tels que le CLIC – Cours de langue pour les immigrants au Canada. Cependant, comme Andrew Griffith a souligné dans la section des commentaires de mon billet Le Multiculturalism redéfini?, les immigrants au Canada anglophone traditionnellement s’intègrent eux-mêmes à la langue anglaise, et l’adoptent naturellement comme la lingua franca”. Par contre, au Québec ce n’est pas forcément le cas que les immigrants adoptent le français comme la lingua franca de la société.  Désormais, le Québec exige que les immigrants suivent une formation linguistique en français dans certaines circonstances).
  • L’Inteculturalisme vise à contrecarrer l’attrait de s’établir au Québec sur la base des forces attractives que s’offre aux immigrants le multiculturalisme (c’est à dire, d’empêcher l’établissement au Québec de ceux qui pense pouvoir s’y établir sans devoir apprendre le français, puisque le multiculturalisme est moins axé sur une intégration linguistque forcée). Par conséquent, l’interculturalisme contient des dispositions supplémentaires d’intégration plus explicites, et dont le but est plus concret et plus immédiat.  Ces derniers éléments de l’interculturalisme vont au-delà des points que partagent les deux idéologies ensemble.  Pourtant, cet élément d’intégration plus prononcé de l’interculturalisme ne va pas aussi loin que l’assimilation.  Du même coup, il n’est pas aussi souple que le multiculturalisme.
  • Le multiculturalisme facilite une intégration bilingue (hors Québec), tandis que l’interculturalisme “dirige” les immigrants vers le français et une intégration dans la société francophone au Québec (sans aucune “canalisation” vers l’anglais).
  • L’Interculturalisme cherche à assurer la “sécurité linguistique” du Québec, et ce dans différents domaines de la vie (le travail, l’éducation, et le gouvernement). Ces mêmes politiques ne sont pas nécessaires (et n’existent pas) dans les mécanismes ou dans la “quincaillerie” du multiculturalisme ailleurs au Canada.  La raison en est que l’anglais ailleurs au Canada n’a pas besoin d’être protégé car il n’est pas menacé en l’absence des politiques de protection de langue.

Si nous examinons quelques-unes de ces comparaisons en termes d’aides visuelles (très abstraits), elles pourraient ressembler ainsi :

Graphique 1 : Sur un échelle parallèle, la graphique ci-dessous vous offre un aperçu comment le multiculturalisme et l’interculturalisme sont compatibles :

fr.mc-ic.1

Graphique 2: Sur une échelle parallèle, la graphique ci-dessous vous offre un aperçu à quel point le multiculturalisme et l’interculturalisme partagent les politiques d’intégration des immigrants:

fr.mc-ic.2

 

Graphique 3 : Sur une échelle parallèle, la graphique ci-dessous vous offre un aperçu jusqu’à quel point les gouvernements ont de la souplesse et de la latitude politique afin d’attribuer des éléments d’intégration, en tant que politique durable, à l’implantation du multiculturalisme et de l’interculturalisme

fr. mc-ic.3

Il y a quelques jours, certains d’entre vous auraient peut-être lu mon billet Le Multiculturalisme redéfini?”.  Dans ce billet-là Andrew Griffith nous a offert quelques commentaires (ces commentaires se trouvent à la fin dudit billet).  En effet, M. Griffith est un des plus éminents spécialistes canadiens sur le sujet du multiculturalisme.  J’ai beaucoup apprécié ces commentaires, et je vous encourage donc à lire son blogue, Multicultural Meanderings (parfois il publie des billets en français).  Les sujets couverts dans son blogue constituent une lecture très intéressante.

Le blogue à M. Griffith, Multicultural Meanderings, comprend une grille (ci-dessous) très instructive.  Elle fait la comparaison de plusieurs éléments partagés par le multiculturalisme et l’interculturalisme.  D’ailleurs (qui serait sans doute d’intérêt aux Québécois), c’est une grille à laquelle il a travaillé ensemble avec Gérard Bouchard (le frère de Lucien Bouchard), un des coprésidents de la Commission Bouchard-Taylor.  Cette grille est directement liée aux sujets en question, et je tiens à remercier M. Griffith pour l’autorisation d’utiliser sa grille.

Cliquer afin d’agrandir la grille

fr.mc-ic

Dans mon dernier billet, M. Griffith a commenté que le gouvernement Conservateur est en train d’accorder un degré plus élevé au côté discrétionnaire de l’intégration du multiculturalisme (voir la graphique 3) – c’est-à-dire qu’il est en train de produire un effet de levier pour faire en sorte que le multiculturalisme puisse pencher sur ses propres mécanismes pour mieux intégrer les immigrants.

Dans mon billet “Le Multiculturalisme redéfini?”  j’ai souligné que la définition du multiculturalisme, telle que définie récemment par Justin Trudeau, semble vouloir pencher plus vers un intégration accrue des immigrants elle aussi (pas loin du point de vue des Conservateurs mêmes).

Ce degré accru d’intégration n’est certes pas incompatible avec la position propre du Québec, tel qu’appliqué sous forme d’interculturalisme québécois.  Je crois bien que les positions des Conservateurs et des Libéraux fédéraux, qui penchent de plus en plus vers l’intégration des immigrants, font en sortes que le multiculturalisme canadien est maintenant plus compatible avec l’interculturalisme québécois, plus qu’à toute autre époque de l’histoire moderne du pays.

Dans le billet “Le Multiculturalisme redéfini?” j’ai fait le point de dire que la différence entre le multiculturalisme et l’interculturalisme n’est pas aussi grande que certains nous laissent croire.  On pourrait même les voir comme deux idéologies complémentaires, voire symbiotiques – les deux qui travaillent ensemble pour répondre aux besoins du Québec.  Dans des zones où le multiculturalisme ne satisfait pas tous les besoins du Québec, l’interculturalisme est ensuite appliqué afin d’ajouter une couche supplémentaire pour faciliter un niveau d’intégration encore plus accru – tout en étant conforme aux réalités spécifiques du Québec.

Suite à ce billet, je vous offrirai un autre qui portera sur certains aspects les plus controversés du multiculturalisme et de l’interculturalisme, notamment sur “les accommodements raisonnables” – une question qui a tendance à soulever les passions, non seulement au Québec, mais ailleurs au Canada aussi (mais comme vous allez voir, ces aspects plus controversés ne sont pas insurmontables).

À très bientôt!

————————————————————

COMPLETE SERIES:  MULTICULTURALISM AND INTERCULTURALISM (8 POSTS)