Home » Uncategorized » [Montreal Gazette] Dan Delmar: Why sovereignty withered under Stephen Harper (#381)

[Montreal Gazette] Dan Delmar: Why sovereignty withered under Stephen Harper (#381)

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Click here – Dan Delmar: Why sovereignty withered under Stephen Harper

An interesting read.  Some of the points were lightly touched upon in the previous post, and in other posts I had written.

It will be interesting to see how a new government juggles these same sorts of issues.

I would be lying if I said it wasn’t important or a concern.

In a nutshell, in the realm of Federal-provincial relations with Québec on the constitutional (and symbolic) front, Harper used an approach which had never before been tried by a Federal government.  Perhaps he did much of the leg work and laying of foundations which may serve as a road-map for the incoming government.

I’m sure a new government will want to do some tweaking of their own, but at least there are some time-tried lessons already left by the Harper government on which they can build (ie: the wheel doesn’t need to be reinvented, and time does not need to be wasted by trying different approaches with an uncertain outcome).

When I said that it will be interesting to see how a new government juggles these same sorts of issues, perhaps “interesting” is an understatement.

The 2018 provincial election may not seem that far away, but in terms of politics, a lot can always change in a very short period of time (five weeks ago, who would have ever thought we would be where we are today).

POST EDIT, so as to clarify where I share views with the article:  

The focus which I honed in on was the fact that the Federal government staying out of provincial jurisdiction — unless invited by a provincial government to share in asymetric collaboration in domains of provincial jurisdiction — (in addition to gestures towards Canada’s French fact, albeit modest in nature) helped to temper the sovereignty debate.

There are lessons to be had here.

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3 Comments

  1. Andrew says:

    Seats up but share of popular vote flat. So gains reflect vote splits, not increase in support.

    Like

    • True…

      When reading the article, my focus was more on the fact that respecting federal-provincial jurisdiction — unless specifically invited by the provincial government to partake in provincially managed jurisdiction — (and measured gestures towards Canada’s French fact, as small as they were) helped to temper the sovereignty debate.

      It’s a point which should not be neglected, and which should be learned from.

      I agree it did not lead to wider support for the Conservative party in Quebec in and of itself.

      Like

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